blueprint100

Blueprint100 is an open and inviting group who provide creative experiences and opportunities for young people. By offering a diverse programme of workshops, events, and public arts projects in partnership with established artists, we aim to build a vibrant community which is both inclusive and inspiring. Our vision is to empower emerging professionals across the arts. Visit blueprint100.co.uk, Facebook or Twitter for more information.

Curatorial Team

Jordan Chisholm – Curatorial Team Member

To make art, I believe we must at first listen. My practice, both wilfully interdisciplinary and entirely undisciplined, stems from both an interest in care and a performance art background. It recruits from community engagement, having conversations, performing, collaboration with other humans and inanimate objects, movement and listening. My creative practice is deeply rooted in having conversations – I believee human connection is a vital contribution to the well-being of our individual self.

I love Dumfries. It saddens me that not everyone feels the same about the place I call home. I have made it my artistic mission to do something about this. Committed to community arts practice and particularly interested in the therapeutic role of creativity; my ongoing work resides in community development. I am determined that if we all take a little more time to care for each other and the place in which we live, we will begin to feel much more connected to each other, contributing to better mental health.

Liam Templeton – Curatorial Team Member

I consider myself an inter-disciplinarian, having originally studied zoology at university before going on to complete a master’s degree on the topic of quantitative methods in biodiversity, conservation and epidemiology. Around this time, I began to take an interest in the rich culture of environmental art being exhibited throughout the region. In 2016 I received a scholarship from the Scottish Funding Council to undertake a second master’s degree on the subject of environment, culture and communication. This I thought of as my conversion degree from a background rooted in natural science to a more liberal academic pursuit of the arts and humanities. It was during this most recent period of study that I became increasingly involved with blueprint100. My primary aim as part of blueprint100 is to deconstruct perceived barriers that ordinarily prohibit young people from engaging in cultural activities and, in doing so, promote the idea that anyone is capable of expressing themselves creatively.

Michael Moore – Curatorial Team Member

Emily Cooper – Curatorial Team Member

As an original blueprint member, I have been involved since its inception in 2014. I am a visual artist with my own practice being specifically Contemporary Portraiture. I use reclaimed materials alongside more traditional portraiture and figurative drawings, often to address difficult subjects at the human level. That human connection is very important to my work though I believe portraiture does not have to include the human form but can take the shape of an object or theme. I’m incredibly passionate about my work with blueprint as it helped to kickstart my own career as an artist.

I’ve worked on various projects during my time with the organisation, from public art events, workshops, collaborations and career development opportunities for other young artists and I’m excited to work on even more in the future. Blueprint100 provides an alternative route into the arts, the importance of which cannot be overstated.

Katharine Wheeler – Blueprint100 Mentor

As a member of The Stove Curatorial Team Katharine leads for their regional and international partnership development and mentors the youth arm blueprint100. I am a visual artist with a practice that spans from studio-based painting and drawing to public and socially-engaged work and collaboration.  I aim to be relevant, inclusive and inspirational.  This with a strongly observational based practice, a love of the human figure and a growing interest in the value of creativity in societal change.

My studio work has been largely an exploration in observational process and technique using oils and mixed media, fast mark-making alongside more considered compositions. I am constantly growing my understanding of creative process – the ability to take a collection of things, or ideas, jumble them up and make something unexpected with them, to try to see in different ways.

In my approach and thoughts on creative practice I find a fight between “studio” and “community”, “individual” and “public”, Katharine Wheeler the visual artist/painter and Katharine Wheeler the creative thinker, facilitator and instigator.  I have discovered creative process – to explore without predefined outcomes – is part of what an artist can bring into a more socially engaged setting. I find huge inspiration from working with people with endlessly differing perspectives, knowledge and interests.